Solar Oven Experiment #1593


#21

Weather is indeed a factor. Although winter is always obviously cooler, this year has just seen a lot of rain with very cloudy weather so agreed that a different time would be better.


#22

Hadn’t thought of that, but unfortunately I’m in a concrete block “bunker”. We’d have to come up with a way to periodically collect data remotely, especially during winter.


#23

I’m a day late getting this one done. Weather was not cooperative, lost power, driveway looks like an icy luge run. But- I put it together this morning. It was very straightforward and easy to do- aside from trying to tape plastic wrap. I cannot get the data to go to my computer, but the OLED display is working well. Not sure what the problem is on the other sketch- will have to troubleshoot. It is very cloudy with snow predicted, so doing this outside would not work. I have it on a table with a small reading lamp pointing to the foil. Not getting much temp rise- staying at 81 F, not much movement. *** Edit- patience is a virtue- up to 100.7 So- that says to me- do a better build- use clearer plastic- not so wrinkled up, tighten the insulation. I don’t have black construction paper- so I used a garbage bag- probably not as absorbent- reflecting light. I think this is an excellent project for kids to work on at school- as a collaborative exercise, an engineering design process exercise and of course the science.

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum?
At this time of year … nope. However, as we start the year and talk about the history of technology, I’m sure I’d be able to fit it, or something similar, into the curriculum…

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
My younger elementary kids will need taping help… They also need assistance to figure out the angles

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I like the group/job ideas in the slide show and would use those.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
I would love this to be successful in that they actually heat something up enough to “cook”, but it would also be successful if the kids can take on the various roles, troubleshoot and use the EDP.


#24

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
Heat transfer is covered in the next month or so, and climate and weather gets covered in April. Therefore, this fits right in.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
The sensor placement is hard to keep consistent, and I have been consistently running into tech issues.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I would make sure my students are making predictions that are testable, as well as encourage them to focus on real world uses of the lesson.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
My students would look successful if they are interested in pursuing this activity outside of the classroom.


#25

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

This does not fit in my curriculum this year, but next year I am teaching a STEM Course full time and it will then! I would use this in my grade 7 STEM course next year. It would be a perfect fit in transformations of energy.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to successful?
When I had a student volunteer run through this they picked it up quickly with little explanation needed. We have set this up to complete when the weather cooperates.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

I would be responsible for facilitating and questioning as students work through the challenge.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

Student success is engaged students directing themselves and learning from exploration. I also think students wanting to take the experiment a step further or try something else is a sign of success skills.


#26

I am really excited to do try this with my students as soon as the sun decides to stay out a bit longer. I love all the ideas so many of you have posted and will be adopting some of them. We are going to put it out in a second just for fun to get the data and then do it again in the spring, summer, and fall and talk about our findings! Loved the webinar thank you so much!


#27

I can’t wait to try this with my STEAM club students once we get some sun! Polar vortex had students home 4 days last week, but I will definitely try this out as soon as we can.

I appreciate the slide show with the roles of the students along with instructions: Electrical Engineer, Solar Engineer, Scientist.

Thank you also for recording the video so it could watch later as well as over again. There are a lot of real-world connections that students will find interesting and engaging - wood burning stoves used around the world vs solar energy; the hot car scenario. Again the inclusion of resources such as WolframAlpha are great!