OLED Display Hello World #4675


#61

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum?
This lesson would fit in our curriculum when we work on coding. This would be an excellent extension of that. Students often do not see their code come to life and this would do that.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
I think the semantics of the code. In this lesson, it does not require them to do anything. For that reason, I don’t think they would need any support.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
During this lesson, i would be a facilitator. I like to walk around the class as students work and just assist where needed.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Students would be working together. Success would be shown through that excitement they get when it works!


#62

Stations are a great way to do this! Some stations can be unplugged activities or even little resources that allow kids to code like Ozobot.


#64
  1. Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum? This lesson would fit in our curriculum when we work on coding. This would be an additional coding activity. My students have completed many code.org activities. I really like how this actually shows lines of code and how to adjust what they see.
  2. Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful? This is an excellent intro lesson that shows them how to adjust/alter code but does not require them to create new lines of code. My 7th graders would not have any trouble with this.
  3. & 4. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson? If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
    My students would be able to do this as a self-paced lesson so I would be monitoring and assisting as needed. I would encourage thinking, problem-solving, and collaboration. Students should be able to assist one another in thinking through issues.

#65
  • Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
    This lesson would be an engaging first project for my students to help them move from block coding to text-based coding. They will have fun getting to add their names to the code. This helps them make a more personalized connection with the device.
  • Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
    I do not think my 7th or 8th grade students would have any problems completing this lesson successfully.
  • If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
    If I were to teach this lesson, I would introduce it by having my name on the display of my device. As my students worked through this lesson, I would be circulating throughout the classroom to offer guidance and redirection when needed. While circulating the room, I will observe and formatively assess my students’ progress.
  • If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
    For this activity, I would allow my students complete the lesson at their own pace. This will allow me the opportunity to circulate throughout the room to observe and formatively assess my students’ progress and offer guidance when they need it. Student will show success not only by correctly completing the activity, but also by offering help to their peers, answering questions, and describing ways in which they would use a coding activity like this in the real world.

#66

This activity was easy to start with. It gave a basic introduction to the Python coding and what variables can be changed.


#67

Hello World -

  1. Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

This is a great introduction to the device and illustrates basics of input, output, and processing. I can see this working with the curriculum for an introduction to the lessons.

  1. Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?

I work with elementary school kids. I would see students needing extra support on reading lines of code, paying attention to details, and executing the commands.

  1. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

I would introduce the lesson before handing out any of the devices. Then I would hand out the devices and have the students work through the steps. Flipping the lesson would also be good. For example, I run the Innovation Lab, so making an introduction video about the lesson might be a good idea as well. During the hands-on part of the class, I would be walking around the room, assisting students.

  1. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

Student success to me would be embracing a growth mindset and the basics of computational thinking. The commands are easy enough for our students who have been coding for a while, the challenges come when we try to learn a new system.


#68

Flipping the classroom is a great idea. Also, if you put the students in groups then they can do the project together as well and check each other’s code as a learning moment.


#69

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This is a great into to programming. “Hello World” is always the first program in a new language. Then doing some extensions of it is a great way to start building.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Centering the name on the X axis. I’d want them to think of how many bits long the line is. How many characters. How long is their name string? Then think how can they put that all together to compute what X should be.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I’d facilitate and walk around. To nudge them on centering the name string I’d maybe start with a reminder on how dimensional analysis works. Then when centering ask to see their steps on how they computed the X-coordinate for setCursor. They might also need some probing questions of what is the center of the display vs where should X be based on the length of their name string.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Student success looks like understanding how the lines of code correspond to output on the display. Getting what each change does on the display and why instead of just having an answer for every question box.


#70

This challenge is great for tinkering! I really enjoyed playing with the text messages, changing the size of the font, the location and attempting to change the color! This activity is a great activity for hands-on minds-on learning!

This lesson would fit well into one of our technology camps. This lesson was my favorite of the three as I felt I had more freedom to change the code and to immediately see the changes that I made…for better or worse…
I don’t think the students would need any extra support for this activity. Some might get frustrated with the amount of trial and error for centering the text, but that could easily be placated by helping them map out character spaces.
I think for this activity I would give them the challenge, but let them try to figure it out on their own. After a set time I would regroup the student focus and have a discussion/reflection time to see how they handles the different challenge steps and provide guidance (or let the students) provide guidance to those who were still working on the challenges.
Students would show the facilitator their success of each challenge along the way - this challenge has great visuals that the students can share for each challenge.


#71

Thank you for a great introduction!

  1. Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum?
    Currently I teach English to struggling 9th and 10th grade students. Next year I am starting a new program for 9th-12th grade students that are struggling academically, socially and/or emotionally. I will be working with ~60 students and two other staff members to bring hands-on, applicable experiences to help students engage in their learning and develop their skills. This is a fantastic, instant-gratification lesson for struggling students.

  2. Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
    My students would be able to follow the basic review of the items and the physical steps themselves. However, my students would need guiding in how to decipher the new language and how to understand what the questions are asking.

  3. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
    With my students, I would model and discuss step-by-step. It would be important to address the language and vocabulary, explain the acronyms, and discuss what happens during the activity.

  4. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
    My students would first mimic my modeling and take notes on the various vocabulary. They would then explore the new material on their own, coming up with things they notice and things they have questions about.


#72

A great point to make sure that the new vocabulary is introduced to the students!


#73

That trial and error process is definitely important. Also, just FYI, the display only displays white so unfortunately you wouldn’t get much luck with changing the color.:grinning:


#74

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

This would be a great way to integrate a typical coding lesson into the physical computing environment. My course is a physical integrated STEM course with a focus on physics. This low stakes lesson would allow students to look at screens in a different way.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?

If students delete too much of the code while exploring they will need support in reloading it. Students might also need support in pushing boundaries and being fearless in trying new things.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

As an educator I would lead the class in switching from individual to small group to whole group discussion.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

Students would be asked to explore individually, as a group and sharing out as a class. We would go through multiple stages of this process depending on the engagement level


#75

Loved this lesson, because I felt successful from the very beginning. I also am starting to understand how code works.

This is a great intro to code, I would like to have another adult in there with me to help answer questions and encourage them.
My role would be as a facilitator. I would encourage them to take a brave step forward and work in code.

Student success would be shown by programming it to say other things.


#76

Having the ability to change the colors and text sizes will be fun for the students. I look forward to using this.


#77

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

I really like these kinds of lessons to get my students started with basic coding, and problem solving. Circuits and energy is part of our curriculum, so I usually introduce it within that context.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?

I think I could give my students the webpage and have them follow the directions. I don’t see any issues with that, except for the set up. They would not be able to download the drivers.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

I would give clear expectations, make sure they have access to the materials and websites, then just watch. I would provide guidance in the form of asking questions when they come to me, but I really think they can be problem solvers and figure it out.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

“Student success” looks like students being 100% engaged. Struggling, but making progress towards their goals. Jumping up and down when they get something right.


#78

Hi everyone, I’m super late to the game but it’s been awesome reading all of your posts! They’ve been super inspiring while I’ve been trying to get caught up.

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

  • As a Science teacher who’s trying to incorporate some coding and computer science topics into my programming, I would love to include this lesson about co-ordinates. I also love including conversations around the 4Cs as much as possible and see so many connections here. Critical thinking as they explore the co-ordinate plane and figure out how to position their name in the right place. Creativity as they explore different things to display on the screen. Communication and collaboration as they work together to complete the activities and trouble shoot their own issues.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?

  • I anticipate that my boys would need extra support in figuring out how to position things successfully within the grid, keeping in mind text size, etc. To support this I think I would first introduce the activity unplugged or clip on the their Math teacher to introduce this while they’re already working with co-ordinate planes in Math class.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

  • I would envision my role as more facilitator than anything else. Occasionally I think it would make sense to project either a student’s work (who is already getting it) as an example or show the work of someone who is struggling and ask the boys how they might help him through any struggles he was currently having. I don’t see this as an activity that would benefit from a “chalk and talk” set up.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

  • I see student success as being obvious through engagement and through anecdotal feedback.

#79

I could not agree more with what you’re suggesting would demonstrate great student engagement! I totally echoed your response in mine!


#80

Excellent point about introducing new vocab. I really love a focus on key vocabulary!


#81

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This lesson gives a good introduction to how the OLED works and how you can control things on the screen. For my STEM club who have never used arduino. Since programing arduino is always part of the Lockheed Martin Robotics competition, this would be a fun intro - especially since they can figure out how to display the data they need to fulfill a task instead of just seeing an LED light up.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Nothing here would be a stretch for my students
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
Tell students to go at it. Explore, Explore, explore. My job is to monitor the students and serve as the Answer-Of-Last-Resort
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
The student’s role is the “experimenter”, the “discoverer”. To succeed and to fail. Success would be a selfie with their name on the OLED screen
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