Magnets Experiment #3515


#21

Hand graphing is a lost art! I settle for interpreting the computer generated graph most of the time.


#22
  1. Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

    I can use the magnetic sensor to run an experiment for the physics chapter on magnet fields. I like the lab that we used in our lesson. The Because Learning! where it shows you where to the sensor and the magnets. The layout of the worksheet was worked well. It was straight forward and easy to use. I would print the worksheet double sided and have them use two different kinds of magnets to see how that effected their result.

  2. Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to successful?

    I think that this lab is relatively straight forward. I did have a little issue with the getting some erroneous data from the sensor. When that would happen, I would need to turn off the data recording and restart.

  3. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

    I would be responsible for obtaining the magnets and suppling the worksheet. If I only had one board, then I would hook my computer up to LCD projector so that the students could record that data. I would have them take turns coming up and setting up the magnets and see what happens to the sensor data. After the experiment, I would be a felicitator leading the discussion but having the students look at the data to make their own conclusions.

  4. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

    No, this will be a lesson that I teach next year. What I will have the students do is record magnet field strength that will show on the computer screen. They will move the magnets to the different locations and following the instructions of the worksheet. The main difference will be that I will print the lab two sided and have them do the experiment twice with different magnets.


#23

That is good idea, drawing the field lines. That would fit into my physics chapter perfectly.


#24
  1. Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
    This lesson would be a great one to use when discussing negative slope because of the inverse relationship.
  2. Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
    This lesson seems relatively simple. The only problem I can foresee is if students try to use the computers to do the readings and the computer freezes up. Then I could direct them to use the alternate method with the OLED and Sensor Board.
  3. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
    My role as the teacher would be to provide support as needed. I could also ask them further questions to make them think a little more about what they are doing as they are conducting the experiment such as why they think they are getting the results they are. What do they think would happen if they added another magnet? Etc…
  4. If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
    My goal is for my students to be engaged and proactive in their learning. If they are able to see the inverse relationship and begin to understand what a negative slope means then I will consider this a successful lesson.

#25

Just another proof of how much math is used in science. I love how you used correlation as a way to describe the relationship between magnets/distance and the addition of magnets. In math we would say there is a negative slope or correlation with the distance because the further the distance the lower the magnetic field and a positive slope and correlation with the number of magnets because the more magnets the higher the magnetic field. So much fun.


#26

Angela,
I appreciate your idea of using the one board with the whole class. I was trying to figure out how I could do this with a group, and your idea of using the projector so students could record data was great. I think students would enjoy the magnet tests, and since there are four tests with three attempts w/1 magnet and three attempts w/2 magnets, most students would get a turn. Thanks for this idea.


#27

As I am a librarian, I can see using this lesson as one of our lunchtime or makerspace type of activities. Many of the students enjoy science and electronics, so I imagine using the magnets with the sensor kit would be fun for them. With only one kit, I’d probably let small groups of two or three try the activity.
I also think our science teachers would be interested in this activity. Making a hypothesis, experimenting, recording data, analyzing the data… I’m sure this activity would also be fun for the students. I am no scientist, but I thoroughly enjoyed the magnet tests and the surprising results.

I think some students might need help with understanding how to hold the magnets. I think I might have benefited from some background information. (Again, I’m a librarian. Perhaps students in science classes have knowledge that I have forgotten.) Even without this information, I enjoyed the process.

I think the teacher’s role would be to provide materials, background information, and facilitate the experimenting. Students would be successful by cooperating with others, sharing materials, completing the tests and recording results, and especially by sharing results, conclusions, and questions. The questions that arise from these activities are what I think lead to the idea of lifelong learning. Curiosity to seek additional information!


#28

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum?
I am working on a drone and magnets unit. Essentially the drone is programmed through Tynker to search for magnetic fields which represent either enemy locations or strategic supply drop locations. This lesson worked great by introducing the magnetic field material in a unique way. We explored the difference between ceramic and neodymium magnets.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Again just making sure the technology is working like it should and not human error.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
A successful teacher will help only when interest is in danger of being lost. A new challenge for advanced students or some guidance for the frustrated.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Success is not cleaning up right away or asking to stay longer or after school to continue to tinker and conquer the challenge. They are truly interested and want to learn more about magnets and the programming of the sensor.


#29

I do many experiments and activities that use magnets. This will fit in perfectly with my curriculumn. I do one activity where I use a magic box to hide magnets in a box and the students have to use a magnetometer to find them. Now I can do the same experiment and compare the two magnometers. I would use this experiment as scafolding for my experiment using the magic box. I would use the magnometer that I already have and give the students instructions to connect theirs to see if they get the same results with both magnometers.

The experiment was straight forward and easy to follow. It also helps that I have a background with a similar experiment.

For me student success would be connecting the two lessons and using what they learn in this experiement and to apply it to the magic box.


#30

Mapping the field lines could also work in Earth Space science whrn talking about the Earth’s and the sun’s magnetic fields.


#31

Oh! I would love to hear about the results of the comparison of the two magnetometers–I’d also love to hear about the magic box! What is it?


#32

A magic box is a shoe box. I randomly tape down manets to the bottom of the box. Then I put graph paper on the lid. You need stron magnets for this. The students measure the magnetic field from the clodes box and try to determine where the magnet is hidden in the box. You can use different shading to show strength of the field or different colors. Then you can have one group make the box for another group and they can switch. After looking on your website I found a similar experiment with a sea turtle and magnetic fields.


#33

I love this so much!!! Thank you for sharing!


#34

Great idea all around. I do a simple a project where students are given a ruler or tape measure and a magnet. They slowly push the magnet closer to the magnetometer, in my case we were using a PocketLab. They record the readings a several different distances and then graph the data. We use different numbers, sizes, or strengths of magnets to see how those variables change the data and corresponding graphs.

The magic box sounds like a great project to follow up with. With the magic box name do you show a video or demonstrate a simple magic trick that used magnets under a table? I don’t know of one, buy I am sure there is an easy one to use an attention grabbing activity to start the class or unit.


#35

I received that same error message back on the getting started lesson. Are you using a PC? Windows 10? When I got that error, I went into the device tree, uninstalled the seeduino, restarted my Windows 10 machine, then followed all the getting started steps again from the beginning. The second time through it worked and has continued to work since.


#36

Lindsey, I love your sketch. It makes reading the data much more clear.


#37

I love how this lesson ties in the scientific method very clearly. Start with an observation, then form a hypothesis, experiment, collect data, analyse the data and form a conclusion. I love that it then continues with questions about different strengths of magnets, and seeing if the results are the same with repetition of the experiment…basically running through the scientific method again but with a new variable. This is a great lesson to introduce the scientific method. I can also see a math ratio lesson in here. What is the ratio between the distance of the magnets and the strength of the field? What is the ratio between the field strength at a given distance for one magnet compared to two or three magnets? Is the ratio the same as the number of magnets increases?

I think the kids will have this lesson down with no real hiccups. By now, they are already familiar with assembling the Seeduino in the proper configuration, loading the code, and a the print out helps tremendously with the distance measurements.

I think this one will be a mostly hands off lab. I will give the instructions and the tools and turn the kids lose…obviously being there to observe and help if something does go wrong. A mini research lesson, having the kids look up the properties of magnetic fields, might be a good addition to this lesson. I think I would wait to have them do the research until after they have done the initial experiment. Then they can see if their research gives them more understanding of the results they got. Follow that by completing some modified experiments (more magnets, different distances, different types of magnets) and then see if their understandings hold true.

By this time in the curriculum, I want the students to be acting more independently. Some of them in particular want a lot of hand holding all the time, but this is a good lesson to tell them, “sorry, you do this one on your own.” It might be fun to see if different groups get different results and them have the students try to figure out why and resolve the differences.


#38

I love, love, love this idea. What a fun “game” to play at the end of a lesson on magnetism! I look for ways to game-ify learning every chance I get…then you get to be the “cool”…uh, hum…I mean…ode gucci teacher. :wink:


#39

Thank you so much Jennifer!