Knock Knock Joke with the OLED Display #4707


#82

Yes, this activity lends itself to a multitude of creative ideas for students. I only noticed 2 challenges on this activity. :thinking::roll_eyes:


#83

I really enjoyed this activity! In particular I like the use of an input to move the process forward. I’ve found that my boys tend to engage best when they have control over the inputs that they use, so I’d love to explore how we could could use a series of different inputs.
Echoing much of what’s been said before I definitely anticipate some frustration when things don’t work perfectly the first try. However, given everyone’s familiarity with the knock knock joke format, I anticipate their willingness to power through.
I really like that this activity takes something the students are going to be familiar with and challenges them to adapt it.


#84

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This doesn’t fit into any current curriculum I have, but it would be a great “next step” lesson for students as they learn the process of coding. It also would help them insert their own creativity and ability to understand how to adjust current coding to make their own jokes.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Some students may be a bit impatient with setting up their systems. It would be important to allow them to do this themselves for practice, but they would need extra support in working with the fine materials.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
For this lesson, I would try to project the image of the OLED Display as I demonstrated the initial lesson with them. For my students, I would then project the coding so they could discuss and decipher among them.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
After the initial introduction, I would have students work in small groups to come up with their own knock-knock jokes and adjust their coding to practice with one another.


#85

The great thing about this lesson is that the students can see their coding come to life!


#86

I have had a couple of bad displays. See if you can get a replacement.


#87

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum?
Lesson fits my curriculum as I am working to prepare my 9th and 10th grade students to write their own code for projects in 11th and 12th grade.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
My students would need no extra support to be successful with this experiment, but I would like to use it as an extension to understand the syntax of the code. I myself am not very familiar, so the initial declarations in the sketch are a mysterious. How can I quickly figure out what these things mean?

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I typically facilitate projects after a brief conversation. In this case I might ask the students to write down their knock knock jokes before we start looking at the code. After the fact we would have a discussion about what is going on with the code and the sensors.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
They would have successfully coded their knock knock jokes. As an extension, I would also challenge them to change the display timing and explain what happened.


#88

Hello Jessie,
Thanks for the message. Some of the lessons have a program that don’t send any data to the OLED would you please test the “Hello World”: https://ehub.ardusat.com/experiments/4675
You only need to have the OLED plugged into the Seeeduino. Pls see if you can get the Hello World to display after running the program.
Hope this works for you?
Thanks kevin@becauselearning.com


#89

This seam to be an extension to the hello world activity. I would use it to continue to teach coding and allow the student to experiment with code.

I don’t the students would necessarily need more time. But I think before we start i would have to come up with one or two jokes. So that they can have them before hand.

i would be a facilitator for learning much like in the other projects. I would asset where needed but allow the student to explore.

Success for the students would mean that they were able to complete the lesson and then develop the lesson even further. The would under the code and how to modify the code.


#90

This does not really “fit” into my curriculum per say…but I could make it fit into other things. Students could program it to give coordinates or instructions as a clue in an Escape Game.

Here was my knock knock joke: Knock, Knock. Who’s there? Orange. Orange Who? Aren’t you glad that I didn’t say Wanda or Lettuce???


#91

The lessons were helpful to me as this is completely new. Learning to navigate the coding was easier than I imagined. Taking each step one at a time helped reduce tech stress. I am not sure how this would be implemented in my curriculum, but just learning the process will give me ideas to integrate and create.

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)? As I am learning to navigate this process, I will think about application as we collaborate ideas with fellow teachers.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful? Some will need front loading of vocabulary and some will need assistance in reading.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson? I like to do a step by step process with the Elmo and projection. Working in partners can also help participation and collaboration.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like? Engagement and creativity with desire to do more! Staying on task is beneficial.
Leave a comment on another AstroSchool participant’s reflection.


#92

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)? I’m not sure how well this would fit into my middle grades science class as is. I could see modifying it as a review game Students could make review questions with answers and then share (at least in non-COVID times…) with classmates. It would help the question creators review and the code testers would be reviewing as well.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful? Since my students are, for the most part, new to coding, they would need some help understanding the very basics of the code. But, I think it would be easy to show them how to change it which would help them learn a bit of coding.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson? This depends a lot upon the class. For some of my advanced learners, my role would be to introduce it and let them go. For my students who struggle at times, I would need to be providing more assistance at first.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like? For the students, I would define success at being able to make the OLED display what they want it to. If I was using it as more than a coding activity, I would also look for the content of what they display and that would be a factor in determining success.


#93

The students would have fun changing the jokes to match their sense of humor. I could see them eagerly changing the wording and sharing them with each other,