Knock Knock Joke with the OLED Display #4707


#21

I agree. I also teach 4th grade. I teach block coding to my students and when they start coding robots, if their program doesn’t work the first time some students are ready to give up!


#22

We had such a great time using this code. The kids caught on SUPER quickly. I showed them the basics and they were able to reason their way through the editing. It was AWESOME! They wanted to change the color of the writing and ended up changing it to black. I questioned the black color on a black background, but they said, “Let’s try it anyway!” I LOVE THAT! They edited the font sizes and reiterated their ideas numerous times. Not intimidated at all! I was elated!
Uploading… Uploading… Uploading… Uploading… Uploading… Uploading…


#23
  1. This lesson doesn’t fit with my curriculum per say, but it would be a great starter lesson to introduce students to the kit and coding protocol.
  2. Students might need extra support in understanding where code can be manipulated because some may give up if they continually get an error. Also, secondary students would need to be monitored for appropriateness of joke language.
  3. When teaching the Knock Knock lesson, the role as teacher would be to assist students as needed. For example, when students hit a roadblock and their frustration escalates to the point they can’t progress, then I would step in. Otherwise, I would provide positive encouragement to keep moving forward. Overcoming the struggle is a rewarding part of the process!
  4. A successful teacher would float around the room, monitoring student progress, providing support when critical, and encouraging/questioning to provoke thought and progression.
  5. The student’s role while working on this lesson would be to actively and safely explore the materials and coding language to see how they can manipulate them. “Student success” would look like students excited about something they figured out and shared with me, their peers, or the class as a whole. The student “made” the program do something they wanted it to do!

#24

I agree that I liked the basic skills students develop in a fun and easy way too! I also liked the repetitive nature that allows student to experiment over and over again.


#25

Yes, I like that they can experience success and then have the ability to create and either fail/try again or succeed. Even my lowest students feel like they have been successful then.


#26

I did this experiment, but in the middle of it, the display started acting funny and then died completely :frowning:

-Keri Book


#27

Hi Keri, sorry for the issue. I’ll get a new one in the mail to you. Thanks!


#28

Oh my! That was fun! The directions were very easy to follow and my students would LOVE this! They even liked just reading the ones I put in! I know they would be very engaged with this lesson and would be able to follow the directions as written with minimal support from me.


#29

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
While this is not part of my Science core. This is a good step in helping the students learn how to use the screen and the sensor, and some intro to coding.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Altering the code to change the jokes is pretty easy. Changing it to use the sensor will take a bit more instruction and support.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I would set up a link to the tutorial or have some visual instructions for them to follow. I would then be available to help groups as they need it.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Student engagement would be high, they would e working in groups, with specific assignments. There would be some way to share their jokes as well as their method of solving the sensor challenge portion of the assignment.


#30

Where you able to do Challenge #3 and get the sensor to drive the joke progression? If so I would love to hear how you did it. If not still share so we can see your jokes!


#31

I am a little behind in this. Sorry. It took a little while to get my computer up and comunicating after break. Just finished this activity. So fun. I am not sure how to do the third part. Any hints out there?


#32

Thank you! I got it in today!


#33

Glad to get a new Display unit!

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This lesson could fit in many facets of my curriculum. This could be used as a flash card scenario where students input questions and answers. This could be used as informal assessment for understanding and grammatical usage. Also, students could build this code to reflect sequence in a chapter of a novel or in scientific process.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Students would need more support in the area surrounding the code. Also, support would be given to students trying to reset code for frustration’s sake.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I would place myself in a facilitating role. Probing or stem questions would be used to drive discovery. In some cases, I may be sitting beside them learning with them and contributing my ideas. Ask about how we could use this in class and how we could use it in the real-world.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Student success would not necessarily be a perfect code or even work properly. The success would be the trial and error and failing forward. Of course student success could be measured in many ways but creating a working code could be the formal measurement.


#34

I love these kits and the experiments!! While this does not fit with my curriculum at the time, I hope to be able to add it in the near future. I would like to have the students work on it themselves and then troubleshoot when needed. I would act as the moderator and help them facilitate success for this activity. Students would be engaged and active as they experiment with what they can do with the sensor, changing colors, jokes, using their imagination and discover the opportunities.


#35

I actually had a student run through this too. It was a super fun introduction for them. I want a class set!


#36

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

This does not fir in my curriculum this year, but next year I am teaching a STEM Course full time and it will then!

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to successful?
Patience with the pins probably. Junior high students tend to be impatient and often try to force things.

I think that this lab is very simple and straight forward. I think that they might need a little explanation about the how the pins match up to the different colors on the color wheel. I also teach a little bit about potentiometers in the electricity chapter. This lab would be a good introduction.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

I would be responsible for facilitating and questioning as students work through the challenge.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

Student success is engaged students directing themselves and learning from exploration.


#37

Had a lot of fun with this at the beginning of the AstroSchool when we started (sorry didn’t post sooner :grimacing:) One of my students was a bit grumpy but by the end of class he was smiling and putting in his own jokes. I love how the code is there and they are just experiementing with a portion of it and how when then accidentally delete a character needed for the code to work properly there is something for them to look at for reference or they can start over withoug feeling like they’ve lost a lot of information etc. Also being able to just peruse the code is very helpful as they are learning to code. :slight_smile: