Cue Fade With Multiple LEDs #5198


#21

Thank you sooo much for posting this image of the wiring! I cannot see the #%$#$# holes to save my life… Now I get it and it worked!


#22

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This lesson does fit in with some of the grade 3 and grade 3 stem. However, I would do this as a microbit expt or maybe a rasp pi. The wiring makes me nuts.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
The wiring. I would need someone who can actually see to help. It would also really help to have those labels that you can get for Pi on the breadboard.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I would ask students to explain what was happening and why. I would challenge them to make a change in the code or the breadboard and predict what would happen. I might also offer some other resistors- what difference will they make

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
The kids would work in pairs. Success is lighting up the board and explaining what is going on.


#23

This activity I would use as an introduction for how to learn to figure out using the breadboard, wiring and such. This one was more difficult to wire than the other activities. I also did not have a blue light so I used yellow instead. I also really wasn’t sure which pieces to use until I tried it out. One thing that I thought during this though that would be extremely helpful is if Because Learning came out with photo cards that teachers could print out and laminate. It might be easier for students to wire it up. I know my students would love to see the lights working and think that was cool but the meaning behind it might be over their heads. I did like learning though “why” and “how” my Ozobots work. We actually use these in class and now I can explain why. :slight_smile:


#24

I agree the wiring was much more difficult to do. I liked your suggestion for labels. I was concerned my 4th graders would be frustrated by this.


#25

Here’s a lesson that connects sensor to an LED - https://ehub.ardusat.com/experiments/4461. Is this what you’re looking for @Jessie.Holder?


#26

@KoppinR the photo cards are a great idea!


#27

Definitely make sure to double check your wiring and also test with different LED’s. Another good thing to try is to refresh your screen and run the code again. Let me know if that helps!


#28

Here’s a lesson that shows you how to wire up to 10 LED’s:


#29

Yes! Perfect. Thanks Sunny. That cat has serious vertical… Haha


#30

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This fits with some parts of the 7th grade curriculum, as well as 8th grade’s light waves unit
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
The wiring and connectivity could pose challenges.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
By making sure that the each student has a defined role during the lab, and that directions are clear
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
I like to have my students “teach” each other after certain labs, and I think this would really be fun for my students interested in coding.


#31

Success!! Can’t wait to have my kiddos try this. Love all the ideas on how to expand this project. I also used the yellow and was not sure which resistor to use, so I just picked the 10 K Ohm. I’ll let my students try both to see the difference.

IMG_3280


#32

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum?
This is an activity I can use both with my advanced PLTW classes as well my regular technology classes. During basic electronic circuits we discuss components and why we choose some over others to use in circuits. This lesson provides enough info, to make that leap from simple circuits to more involved ones and the programming aspect can be expanded for the advanced classes and used as is for the regular students.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Again, even for regular classes I think this lesson is straightforward enough. I’d probably have to remind them to put the LEDs in the right way and have them make sure their pins and wires line up.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
Facilitator and monitor … have the students do the set up and run the experiment. Little challenges and observational changes can be introduced and discussed.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Students would complete the building of the circuit and successfully run the code. If it doesn’t work, they would troubleshoot and solve. The challenge would be for them to decide on experiments of their own and share them with the class. Explanations for changes should be noted and documented.


#33

I too like my students to figure things out and would encourage them to try experiments of their own making and then share with the class.


#34

I’m thinking of using the future city idea for a class project and I like your notion of using the Arduino as a controller (power grid brain) for the project. I definitely need to start planning this.


#35

Hi there.

Just wondering if we get to maintain our account after this program so that we still have access to the lessons and experiments? If not, may we download them without violating any use rights?

Thanks and this has been great … really a nice platform and well organized.


#36

Great question! Yes, you will still have access to your account for 1 year.


#37

Awesome! Thanks for sharing the picture!


#38

Yes, that cat does. :grinning:


#39
  1. This lesson could be used in my physics class when we discuss electricity or light and the different parts of the EM spectrum or resistors and more specifically photoresistors. I think my students would enjoy it because many of them don’t have experience wiring a circuit and this type of activity is fun to test and explore. I’ve also found that many of my female students are quite tentative when working with electricity and always want the male students to do the activity. Because of this I make sure that everyone in the class does the activity on their own. It’s amazing how something so simple builds so much confidence in students. I love it!

  2. I don’t think extra support is needed for high school students if they’ve done previous work with the materials. As long as they have been taught vocabulary and can identify the parts of the system, they should find success.

  3. As a teacher my role would be to provide the materials and support as students follow the instructions and test their work. Science can be messy so there isn’t always a final outcome, but the nice thing about these labs is students are seeking for feedback from the kit and their faces light up when they get it.

  4. Student success looks like students accomplishing what they set out to do. Science can be messy so there isn’t always a final outcome tied neatly with a bow, but the nice thing about these labs is students are seeking for feedback from the kit and, if done correctly, they will get the feedback they are seeking. It’s awesome to see their faces light up when they get it!


#40

@ArdusatExplorer-4845 I do love that students have to troubleshoot where they went wrong. This is a such a critical skill for students to build and this type of lab experience lets them do it in a safe way.