Color Mixing with RGB LED #1754


#48

I think for a lot of teachers, working for microcontrollers and coding is a new experience so it’s ok to not know all the answers. Some of the best learning experiences that I’ve had with teachers and students is when we didn’t know the answer, but worked together to figure it out. We would troubleshoot different things that we thought could be wrong with our experiment, look things up online, etc.


#49

This lesson was really awesome and it definitely would fit in the 4th grade curriculum. I could see teaching this during a lesson on light.
The lesson got a little more difficult adding additional wiring, but as long as there are instructions and pics for the students to look at while completing the steps, they shouldn’t have any problems.
Anytime I am teaching code in my classroom I walk around and provide help and support as needed, but allow the students the freedom to make mistakes and correct them. They can problem solve on their own most of the time and figure out what is wrong with their programs. I think students would be highly engaged in a lesson like this. It also leaves plenty of room for individuality and creativity.


#50

I also think this would be a great activity for a unit on waves.


#51

Sometimes with the smaller components it can be difficult and I’ve had to double-check student set-up frequently when they say things don’t work. For my regular classes I generally have them follow the setup instructions to the letter / number as it definitely helps cut down on error, but I have not yet found a foolproof way to avoid wiring errors. Another thing that helps is enlarging the setup on a projector and then actually walking through the physical wiring with them too … it takes more time but saves on frustration on both sides.


#52

I like this lesson as a tie in to digital design and use a little bit of design history to accentuate the importance of color-coding. In the “olden” days of print, designers had to be very specific about what colors printers had to use when physically printing documents to ensure marketing pieces retained the original look. Monitors display colors differently depending on their capability and individual setup so it was paramount for designers to specify the color codes when transmitting their design to the actual printer otherwise an important marketing piece could’ve ended up looking very different from the company specifications.


#53

Yes, but the hole spacing is pretty much the same. The components are what they are. I try to always keep one setup permanently so that I can have it ready for students to review as they work through projects.


#54

Yes, I definitely think because we have access to so much information that we can actually develop more skills like coding even if we don’t have background knowledge in it.


#55

That’s a great idea!


#56
  1. This lesson is a great exploration of color. I feel I could fit this into any of my physical or earth science classes when we explore color, visible light, and/or wavelengths and the EM spectrum. This would have been particularly useful in middle school science when I taught color and light. I struggled with finding fun ways to help students differentiate between colors of light and colors of pigment- this would have rocked!

  2. The part of the lesson that students may need extra support in order to be successful is understanding the code, I agree that students may be thrown off that 0 means more of that color and 255 means none. However, I could liken this to the confusing aspect of star magnitudes! As others have mentioned too, any visually impaired students would struggle with reading the extremely fine print on the seeeduino and bread board so a magnifying glass or hand lens would be helpful.

  3. While teaching this lesson to a class, the role of a successful teacher is one of a coach and mentor- assisting students as needed when huge roadblocks or difficulties arise but letting the struggle and self-discovery take a front row seat so students continue to find confidence and success in their skills. Also, allowing time for collaboration and sharing out of skills/concepts learned.

  4. The students role in this lesson is to be actively engaged in exploring at working through each step of the process. Recording information as they learn it is beneficial in helping students process the concepts/skills they are learning. Student success looks like students sharing with each other the things they are learning and the skills they are developing. Students are not afraid to make mistakes and seek to help each other be successful!


#57

I really like experiments or lessons such as this because it opens a student’s eyes to things substantially present in their life and they had no idea. Between home and school, how long does a 12-13 year old look at something utilizing this technology? Helping them understand how that works is a pretty cool thing. So, thanks for the tools!

It is pretty easy to place any type of energy transfer into our curriculum because of the 6-8 grade block in NGSS. Although, I wouldn’t say properties of light is a topic we cover in great detail, but I could fit this in through supplemental coding and physical computing practice/experimentation. Also, several areas of Language Arts could be applied to research origins or present new ideas for use. I did follow the next lesson at the bottom of that RGB lesson, which used Ratios, Percents, and Decimals (a huge part of math in 6th grade)!

Physically, I don’t think many of them would struggle with the precision of this lesson. We do several activities with Raspberry Pi, which give them a good background in breadboard and reading diagrams.

I would function as an invisible overseer. Students would be in a setting where I did not exist and had to solve their problems without the help of a teacher. I enjoy scenarios where I take this role, at this age it changes their idea of where to find assistance and what form that assistance may come in. Perseverance, confidence, and many other characteristics blossom or begin to expose themselves when forced into this scenario or similar parameters.

Student success would be understanding how to apply variables, constants, and how to conduct an experiment while keeping it organized and recorded. I would be more critical in this lesson of the precision to coding and physical computing aspects (whether or not their light functioned correctly). I would be interested to see everyone’s thoughts on how success could look in their setting.

new%20rgb
I am still seeing spots! Haha.


#58

More so than the values of color, I played with the interval speed. I tried to find a range of where I could see the interval and when I couldn’t. An hour later, I still see spots!


#59

Getting the sensors in is very difficult but the lesson at least in the initial form is cool. I could not get the color to change and seeing the little child play with it makes me a bit self conscious. I could see that students could get frustrated without some guidance/facilitation. It is engaging but difficult. This does not currently fit with my curriculum.


#60

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?

This does not fit into my curriculum this year, but next year I am teaching a STEM Course full time and it will then! I am going to try to get a class set of these kits.

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to successful?
Patience with the pins probably. Junior high students tend to be impatient and often try to force things.

Students always need support in matching things up. I would use my smart board and walk them through the first time step by step.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?

I would be responsible for facilitating and questioning as students work through the challenge.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?

Student success is engaged students directing themselves and learning from exploration.


#61

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
Although this lesson doesn’t fit in directly, the students were making connections to their art classes and color mixing with paint and understanding technology (screens, gaming codes, etc.). They felt great success with even making the light illuminate and the flashing speeds, so it was a great confidence builder for them to begin trial of different colors without fear of failing/messing up.
Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?
Everything was manageable for the students and laid out well for the students. They struggled most with manipulating the numbers of the code. Some guidance in this area would have been helpful for them, but they did a great job navigating it and learning from their experiences.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
I tend to stand back and let them dive in (because it is such a small group) and they challenge each other more than I could ever even imagine! They think of things I don’t think of! This lesson lends itself to trial and error with the lesson questions prompting the students well enough to guide them. I am able to enjoy their successes rather than demanding an outcome!
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
Student success is students figuring out how to change the colors, manipulate the code, change it back, use the Potentiometer and consider other uses/applications of this tech in their every day lives. I would also like to see students think of how this impacts their every day activities and interactions with technology each day.


#62

I love that the percents/ratios fit so nicely into your curriculum! I NEED this to fit into 5th, so I can justify using it! LOL Right now, I just implement with a small enrichment group, but they are all DREAMING of the day they get to code the “computer chip!” I’ll keep looking for my “in”!


#63

Great connection with art! I need to get on your level Becky. On percents and ratios, it is never too early, 5th grade or not, to get those students realizing fractions are proportionally equivalent to decimal and percentage representations! Keep doing what your doing!


#64

I really like your idea of using the RGB lesson to practice Ratios, Percents, and Decimals. I am starting that topic next week and this will provide a high-interest way for the kids to experiment with the arduino while secretly learning math and gaining more exposure to variables. I do a lot with formal lab report writing in the beginning of the year, but this would be great to use halfway through the year as a reminder of variables and data collection.
The tricky part would be the wiring set up, where they may need a little support, but after that they should be fairly confident working with the code to change the color ratios. Student success will be easily visible in their ever-changing lights and they will also have the formal record of their ratio data to hand in. I love when math and science go hand and hand!


#65

Where does this lesson fit in with your curriculum (if the lesson is not a fit for the class you teach, how could the lesson be modified so that it is applicable to your curriculum)?
This fit great with our curriculum because our curriculum for this ‘class’ is learning how to use the sensor kit :slight_smile:
After reading some of your comments I want to use the RGB lesson to practice Ratios, Percents, and Decimals - that is brilliant thinking - thank you!

Which part or parts of the lesson would your students need extra support in order to be successful?

It took a bit to figure out the number portion of the code for changing colors - a little tutorial or mini-lesson would probably have been great, otherwise they did fabulous and had a lot of fun with it.

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your role during the class. What does a successful teacher actively do during this lesson?
Because my students have had some experience I can watch them explore and figure things out. It’s exciting and fun to listen them want to try out different things. Some are more excited then others but they do help each other and I think when students teach students everyone learns a ton more than if it was just me telling/directing them what to do next :slight_smile: It’s a lot of fun to watch the patience and kindness they can show each other (on a good day of course)

If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like?
I beleive success is when the students figure out how to change the colors, manipulate the code, change it back, use the Potentiometer and consider other uses/applications for how to this technology is used within the real world outside the classroom. When they say “ohhh so that’s how it’s done - awesomel” especially when they make the connection with video games, TV programs, Movies, artwork etc. that they enjoy. When they realize that there’s alot of math and science that goes into the creation of the things they use everyday, that it’s ‘cool’, and that they can be part of creating those ‘amazing things’ it’s a good day.


#66

This was a very interesting lesson, but agree that it is difficult to see some of the holes for inserting the pins. During use of the potentiometer, I had to use a different hole than the diagram showed because there was not enough room. Despite this, it worked out.
This would fit with middle grade physical sciences and the study of wavelengths.
I would introduce this lesson and then explain the setup. I would provide students with kits that were already wired. At each change, I would have a para work with students and explain the new setup.
I would definitely be more hands-on with this lesson than with others due to the more complex wiring. I would work with one group and then observe other groups.
If you were to teach this lesson to your class, describe your student’s role during the class. What does “student success” look like? This lesson (and many of the Beyond Learning lessons) has additional tasks that groups can do. That means students newer to coding can get experience at that level and more advanced students can continue with extension activities that meet those needs. Success means all students engaged and asking questions and building understanding.


#67

I like the idea as using this as a history lesson for digital design. Colors and color perception are important in nearly everything we do these days. I think it will be interesting for my students with visual impairments to determine the different colors that they can see. It will definitely be a fun motivator!